WorkshoPS

Research integrity

Research integrity

Integrity is a requisite for research, as a lack of integrity hampers not only data reliability and their prospective FAIRness, but also affects the interface between science and society. The COVID-19 pandemic hardly hit the societal trust in science, hence the attention to research integrity has never been so high. Browsing by keywords, Google returns about 954.000.000 results, so where to start if we intend to ground theories, principles, and guidelines into the practice of our research?


We will apply the format provided by Hazel Newton, Dr Ed Gerstner, Dr Jo Appleford-Cook, Christina Emery and Laura Graham-Clare, all at Springer Nature Ltd., to delve deeper into that. The very same guidelines for workshop were applied to a group mostly composed by publishers -at ISBS24, we will work from the researcher’s perspective.


To get ready for that, we kindly invite you to fill up the questionnaire which will be used as baseline for discussion. The ISBS24 audience, with its diverse perspective and experiences is set to be a great context to share viewpoints and lessons learned.


Here is the link to the form

Thank you!

Lucia

Integrity is a requisite for research, as a lack of integrity hampers not only data reliability and their prospective FAIRness, but also affects the interface between science and society. The COVID-19 pandemic hardly hit the societal trust in science, hence the attention to research integrity has never been so high. Browsing by keywords, Google returns about 954.000.000 results, so where to start if we intend to ground theories, principles, and guidelines into the practice of our research?


We will apply the format provided by Hazel Newton, Dr Ed Gerstner, Dr Jo Appleford-Cook, Christina Emery and Laura Graham-Clare, all at Springer Nature Ltd., to delve deeper into that. The very same guidelines for workshop were applied to a group mostly composed by publishers -at ISBS24, we will work from the researcher’s perspective.


To get ready for that, we kindly invite you to fill up the questionnaire which will be used as baseline for discussion. The ISBS24 audience, with its diverse perspective and experiences is set to be a great context to share viewpoints and lessons learned.


Here is the link to the form

Thank you!

Lucia

Validating a standard vocabulary for beach ecosystem studies

Validating a standard vocabulary for beach ecosystem studies

Data sharing, whether depending on the researcher’s attitudes or regulations (see e.g. the Nelson memo, issued in August 2022 to ensure that all US federally funded research “publications and their supporting data” be made available through “free, immediate, and equitable public access”), is becoming a necessity.

While the benefits of open and FAIR access to data are explicit, the effort to create machine-interoperable data still represents a big challenge.

  Different research communities might use different terms to describe the same concept, or the same term may have been used to express several concepts across different communities.

Given the increasing relevance that data have, and will have, in the future, commonly agreed solutions must be created and used to align research products with the FAIR principles.

Standard terminologies allow the precise exchange of information between parties, hence, they represent one of the fundamental pillars of the FAIR principles. During the ISBS we want to offer a workshop to channel collaboration into a tool for data harmonisation, planned to remain accessible to all those who want to build on data interoperability -researchers, data managers, and anyone interested in enhancing communication and collaboration around sandy beach ecosystem research. During the workshop we target to

-Gain a comprehensive understanding of standard terminologies and its benefits for data interoperability.

-Present a vocabulary to standardise data in beach-related research experimental settings

-Collaboratively validate the vocabulary to achieve a commonly agreed tool that might be used to improve data consistency and sharing within the sandy beach research community. 

ISBS participants will set the pace of the workshop. We aim to submit a proceeding paper from the collaborative work with all the workshop participants during and after the workshop.

To allow us to prepare adequately please fill up the questionnaire on FAIR principles perceptions and obstacles https://ec.europa.eu/eusurvey/runner/fairsurvery2023
 
We will be guided through the workshop by

Data sharing, whether depending on the researcher’s attitudes or regulations (see e.g. the Nelson memo, issued in August 2022 to ensure that all US federally funded research “publications and their supporting data” be made available through “free, immediate, and equitable public access”), is becoming a necessity.

While the benefits of open and FAIR access to data are explicit, the effort to create machine-interoperable data still represents a big challenge.

  Different research communities might use different terms to describe the same concept, or the same term may have been used to express several concepts across different communities.

Given the increasing relevance that data have, and will have, in the future, commonly agreed solutions must be created and used to align research products with the FAIR principles.

Standard terminologies allow the precise exchange of information between parties, hence, they represent one of the fundamental pillars of the FAIR principles. During the ISBS we want to offer a workshop to channel collaboration into a tool for data harmonisation, planned to remain accessible to all those who want to build on data interoperability -researchers, data managers, and anyone interested in enhancing communication and collaboration around sandy beach ecosystem research. During the workshop we target to

-Gain a comprehensive understanding of standard terminologies and its benefits for data interoperability.

-Present a vocabulary to standardise data in beach-related research experimental settings

-Collaboratively validate the vocabulary to achieve a commonly agreed tool that might be used to improve data consistency and sharing within the sandy beach research community. 

ISBS participants will set the pace of the workshop. We aim to submit a proceeding paper from the collaborative work with all the workshop participants during and after the workshop.

To allow us to prepare adequately please fill up the questionnaire on FAIR principles perceptions and obstacles https://ec.europa.eu/eusurvey/runner/fairsurvery2023
 
We will be guided through the workshop by

Andrea Tarallo

Currently at CNR-IRET, is the contact point for the FAIRness of environmental Research Infrastructures in the biodiversity domain within the ITINERIS project. A marine biologist by training, his career soon focused on scientific and managerial support to European Research Infrastructures, with particular attention to the management of access to data and services. He contributes to the development of the LifeWatch Italy infrastructure, where he supports the process of mobilising research data from the scientific community, working to ensure that data is collected, stored and shared efficiently and compliant with FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable) guiding principles.

Andrea Tarallo

Currently at CNR-IRET, is the contact point for the FAIRness of environmental Research Infrastructures in the biodiversity domain within the ITINERIS project. A marine biologist by training, his career soon focused on scientific and managerial support to European Research Infrastructures, with particular attention to the management of access to data and services. He contributes to the development of the LifeWatch Italy infrastructure, where he supports the process of mobilising research data from the scientific community, working to ensure that data is collected, stored and shared efficiently and compliant with FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, Reusable) guiding principles.

Dr. Senem Onen Tarantini

Holds a Ph.D. in Marine Science and Technologies from the University of Ege (Turkey, 2017). Currently, she works as a researcher at the University of Salento (Italy). She possesses expertise in applying marine science principles to environmental monitoring programs. Her experience spans various national and international projects, where she has assessed the impact of anthropogenic pollution on benthic organisms, the environmental effects of aquaculture, and the health of vital benthic habitats like Posidonia oceanica meadows and Coralligenous reefs. Her current work for LifeWatch Italy infrastructure focus on harmonizing biodiversity data, particularly for large European partnerships such as Biodiversa + and exploring the process of mobilizing research data to improve the effectiveness of environmental monitoring programs.

Dr. Senem Onen Tarantini

Holds a Ph.D. in Marine Science and Technologies from the University of Ege (Turkey, 2017). Currently, she works as a researcher at the University of Salento (Italy). She possesses expertise in applying marine science principles to environmental monitoring programs. Her experience spans various national and international projects, where she has assessed the impact of anthropogenic pollution on benthic organisms, the environmental effects of aquaculture, and the health of vital benthic habitats like Posidonia oceanica meadows and Coralligenous reefs. Her current work for LifeWatch Italy infrastructure focus on harmonizing biodiversity data, particularly for large European partnerships such as Biodiversa + and exploring the process of mobilizing research data to improve the effectiveness of environmental monitoring programs.